Posts from the ‘Culture’ Category

Gezi Park is now a utopic ‘Freetown’ (Turkish Protests aftermath) ………….

ISTANBUL- Hürriyet Daily News

 

Istanbul’s city center is now a timeless place after the police withdrawal. Closed with barricades, Gezi Park and Taksim now solely belong to the people and ideologies previously deemed closed to the mainstream

 

Two people walk beside a wrecked police car left on Taksim Square. Istanbul’s city center is now a surreal, timeless place after being completely occupied by people following the police withdrawal. DAILY NEWS photo, Emrah GÜREL

Two people walk beside a wrecked police car left on Taksim Square. Istanbul’s city center is now a surreal, timeless place after being completely occupied by people following the police withdrawal. DAILY NEWS photo, Emrah GÜREL

 

Çetin Cem Yılmaz Çetin Cem Yılmaz cetincem.yilmaz@hdn.com.tr

At the entrance of Copenhagen’s famous Freetown Christiania, visitors are greeted with a hand-painted sign reading “You are now leaving the EU.” Right now, something similar can be said for the Gezi Park – it’s no longer Istanbul as you know it.

Since the police withdrawal from the city center on June 1 as a result of clashes with protesters, the Taksim district has been occupied as could never have been predicted. Closed with barricades, the central district now solely belongs to the people, and to ideologies that were previously deemed completely closed to the mainstream.

Bright lights and loud music coming from İstiklal Avenue are not there. Shops are closed, and graffiti fills their windows. On the Taksim Square, it feels like the post-apocalypse has met the day after revolution. A wrecked NTV van and a crashed police car were left like the Berlin Wall remnants – open for photographing. The iconic Atatürk Cultural Center (AKM) has been covered with flags: Legendary 1970’s revolutionary Deniz Gezmiş looks down on the area, while next to him are posters of left-wing groups and a “shut up” call to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

Just a week ago, even the thought of such a scene was impossible. Now, with the occupation, it has become the reality.

Forty-nine percent

Make no mistake, even though it has a passing resemblance to the “Occupy” movement, this is not a “We are the 99 percent” action. It is more like, “We are the 49 percent.” It is the mobilization of thousands who do not find themselves represented in the Parliament. The protests were more about people, mostly youths, making themselves heard by a government that enjoys too much comfort from its majority and forgets to hear the concerns of the minority.

As a crowd that was complaining of discrimination, the Gezi people are embracing their differences beautifully. On June 1, slogans were silenced when a prayer call was heard. “From now on, respect for every belief will prevail,” one said. That approach was again used yesterday, when they asked people not to drink alcohol out of respect to the sacred night of Lailat al–Mi’raj.

Inside the Gezi Park, the utopian feeling is multiplied. There are open buffets for people feeding themselves, yoga sessions in the morning and now, a library. Every morning, after the police withdrawal, protesters got the area squeaky clean. People have fun in their own way and nobody intervenes: Kurds dance their halays, Laz people do their horon dance, and a group with Mustafa Kemal Atatürk flags chant their slogans – All this happens within a few meters’ distance.

There are lots of differences, but no conflict. There’s no police, but it’s safe. No hierarchy, but a humane order.
For a country where the democratic tradition is about rights being given from the top to bottom, it is about reversing the order.

It is about sharing, kindness, and reasoning. So romantic, for sure; but it is there.

We know that it won’t be forever. Enjoy it while it lasts. k HDN

June/06/2013

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Pic of the day : Sting,British Revolution ………….

no comment …….

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Pic of the Day : USA vs Canada ………….

via twitter by

Embedded image permalink

no comment……………..

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……, Is this what you want for your children America ? (filed under : “Herd them and beat them” ) …….

http://blog.alexanderhiggins.com

This video captures NYC police acting like pit bulls, attacking and beating the hell out of non-violent protestors who were not trying to resist and were actually trying to surrender.

This is just one of several videos I have been shown on seen by people on the ground who captured live video of police brutality the Wall Street Mass arrests. Despite the lies you have read about no injuries, no macing, and no police beatings many on the ground tell difference stories and have video to prove it.

Many here do not have the know how to get these videos out to the public who needs to see how the corporate controlled security forces are treating there fellow Americans. This video captures a glimpse of what really is happening on the ground at the Occupy Wall Street Protest.

Make sure you check out NYC Police Attack, Tear Gas And Mass Arrest 2,000 Peaceful Protestors. #OccupyWallStreet and NYC Police Trap Peaceful Female Protestors Inside A Fence Then Mace Them! #OccupyWallStreet

Also, be sure to check back in I have a hard drive of NYC police brutality videos I will be posting.

So help them out and get these videos out and help #occupywallstreet.

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Anti NWO Rock ‘n Reality : Video ,”Crazy” from the 80’s

this is a song  from the 1980’s ,

read the lyrics carefully , they might ring a bell in this times full of war and deception !

Lyrics :

Here’s a little song to make you feel good
Put a little light in your day
These are crazy times
And it’s all been getting pretty serious

Here’s a little song to make you feel right
Send the blues away
Well it’s a crazy game
Tell me who’s to blame, I’m kind of curious.

Right if you win, wrong if you lose
Nobody listens when you’re singing the blues
Well something’s the matter, but nothing gets done
Oh everyone’s waiting for a place in the sun
Well something is wrong now
Can something be wrong with me
Oh brother, why’s it got to be so crazy…

Gimme little left, gimme little right
Gimme little black, gimme little white
Gimme little peace, gimme little hope
Gimme little light
‘Cause you know it seems that the situation’s getting serious.

Right if you win, wrong if you lose
Nobody listens when you’re singing the blues
Well something’s the matter, but nothing gets done
There’s no use in waiting for a place in the sun
‘Cause something is wrong now
Can something be wrong with me
Oh brother, why’s it got to be so crazy…
Oh something is wrong with me
Oh brother, why’s it got to be this crazy…

Video :

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Thanks to >Supertramp<

Songwriters: Davies, Ivor Arthur / Kretschmer, Robert Grant / Qunta, Andy

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Vision: Kenya Enshrines the Environment in Its Constitution — This Should Be Our Future

http://www.alternet.org

There’s a misconception that all significant environmental progress begins in wealthy nations.
January 3, 2011 |
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There’s a nagging misconception that all significant environmental progress begins in wealthy nations, which then shoulder the noble task of aiding and arm-twisting poor nations to do their share in taking care of the planet.

While it’s true that limited financial resources hinder environmental protection throughout Latin America, Africa and Asia, it’s not at all accurate to paint the developed nations as green and developing ones as a brown splotch of ecological ruination.

Indeed, looking at per capita rates of greenhouse and toxic emissions, you might think just the opposite—the overdeveloped nations of the world need to follow the example of their poor neighbors to the south, which dump far fewer pollutants into the global commons. After all, these are the places where precious biodiversity, rainforests and other ecological treasures still exist— the natural ecosystems of Europe and North American were largely ravaged a century ago.

But the developing world doesn’t simply do less of what’s wrong, they also have taken some bold steps in embracing a greener future. In some cases, they are pioneering new approaches to protecting the environment rooted in a sense of the commons— the idea that some thing belong to all of us.

In 2008, Ecuador became the first nation in the world to enshrine the rights of nature in its constitution. The document now asserts that nature “has the right to exist, persist, maintain and regenerate its vital cycles, structure, functions and its processes in evolution” — an innovative new form of environmental legal protection.

And just last month Kenya adopted a “new constitution” that declares in Article 42, “Every person has the right to a clean and healthy environment, which includes the right—a) to have the environment protected for the benefit of present and future generations through legislative and other measures.”

Article 69 of the new constitution also holds the state responsible for maintaining tree cover over at least ten percent of the nation’s land; for encouraging public participation in protecting and managing the environment; protecting indigenous knowledge of biodiversity; and establishing systems of environmental impact assessment.

Obviously, it is easier for a poor nation to implement such rights than to enforce them but Ecuador’s and Kenya’s actions are more than symbolic. They show the possibilities for making environmental protection part of the bedrock of our legal systems.

Burns Weston, Law Professor emeritus at the University of Iowa and Senior Research Scholar at the Vermont Law School, suggests that Kenya’s new constitution might be a model for U.S. states “to improve their state constitutions along these lines.”

Jay Walljasper is editor of OnTheCommons.org, a news and culture website devoted to recognizing the importance of the commons — those things that belong to all of us — in modern life.
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They Invented a Religion to Steal a Land from Its Owners

H/T the ugly truth

http://poorrichards-blog.blogspot.com

By Jihad el-Khazen  daralhayat.com 

I previously proposed in this column the idea that Muslim scholars should attempt to differentiate between the prophets mentioned in the Holy Quran and the prophets of the Jews who are mentioned in the Torah, since any history student in any major Western university (but not an Arab university) will learn that Jewish history is only an amalgamation of biblical myths about prophets, kings and kingdoms that never existed.

In the simplest possible terms, the Israelis have been looking for their “traces” in Palestine for the last 62 years without finding anything so far, to the extent that Israeli archaeologists have stopped looking in Jerusalem. Moshe Dayan, an amateur archaeologist himself, looked for 13 years in the Sinai for the traces of his “ancestors”, but found nothing whatsoever related to Moses or the Wandering Years.

I am well aware of the sensitivity of this subject, and it is for this reason that I only propose an idea and let the Muslim scholars – and I mean Muslim archaeologists and historians and not theologians – to confirm or deny what I and my son studied, in an American and a British university respectively.

Israel’s advocates are so insolent, meanwhile, or obscene, that they actually forge and falsify a modern history that we have lived and seen ourselves. It is thus no wonder that they invented a religion to steal a land from its owners. Recently, I followed four episodes on a U.S. Likudnik website which relied on a French Likudnik website as its source, and which concluded that the child Muhammad al-Durrah was not shot dead by Israeli soldiers while in his father’s lap in Gaza in 2000 and that the footage that the French television and the world media carried, showing the child and his father, was not true.

I suffice myself with the above on that subject, and move on with the Israeli peace advocate Uri Avnery, and his article published on August 16, 2009, which was inspired by a dispute between Palestinian residents of Acre and the Jews there, following a decision by the government to remove all Arab names and keep the (fabricated and falsified) Jewish names which are to be written in Hebrew. Thus, for example, Jerusalem became Urshalim. In Acre, the Jewish-dominated municipality threatened to destroy the monument of the Muslim diver Issa al Awwam who fought with Salah al-Din…But then if Muhammad al-Durrah did not exist in 2000, then why would they acknowledge Issa al-Awwam who lived 800 years before him?

Avnery cites the Book of Joshua in the Bible, describing it as being ‘genocidal’, which is true, since the book mentions that the Lord told Joshua to kill “both man and woman, young and old”. But despite the events of the Book of Joshua, Avnery says that Acre remained a Phoenician city like the rest of the coast of Palestine.

The writer wonders who came to the land of Canaan first, and replies that the Arabs had conquered the land which they called Jund Filistin (military district Palestine) in 635 A.D, and that they ruled it since then without interruption except during the Crusader period. On the other hand, the Zionist version claims that the land belonged to the kingdoms of Judea and Israel, although the coast was Phoenician. Avnery carries on by saying that despite all the unrelenting efforts over a hundred years, no archaeological evidence has been found that there ever was an exodus from Egypt, a conquest of Canaan by the Children of Israel, or a kingdom of David and Solomon.

The article after that speaks of the “legends” of the Torah about Abraham in Iraq and the exodus from Egypt, the Conquest of Canaan, King David, and the other legends of the Bible, “which are taught as actual history”, and then the destruction of the Temple and the “exile” of the Jews and their persecution.

Uri Avnery is neither an Arab nor a Muslim. He is an Israeli who served in the Israeli army before becoming a prominent peace activist, and is also a researcher and an authority on the history of the entire region.

I do not ask the Arabs and the Muslims to approve of anything I said above, but only to ask their scholars to study the subject and then enlighten us all.

If they fail to do so, we might find ourselves reading a history where Muhammad al-Durrah was not killed, where Jesus committed suicide (I cannot even insinuate at what the Talmud says about the Virgin Mary), and where Muslims attacked the Jews in Palestine in 1948 to uproot them from their own country. A history where there were and there are no Palestinians (recall what Golda Meir and other ultra-Zionists said), where Egypt attacked the Negev in 1956 instead of Israel attacking Sinai, where Arab armies attacked Israel in 1967 and so Israel had to respond in self-defense (I swore that I read this in their writings as I read that the United Nations is ‘Muslim’), where Hezbollah invaded Israel in the summer of 2006, and where Hamas attempted to invade Ashkelon two years later. We might also read that Israel did not kill 1500 Palestinian minors in this decade alone, compared to 135 Israeli minors, that B’Tselem’s figures are false and that it is infiltrated or that B’Tselem lies like all peace activists around the world, including Jews, and maybe even that this article itself does not exist except in the readers’ imaginations.

khazen@alhayat.com

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