Posts from the ‘Anti government protests’ Category

Videos from Ukraine that the US/EU Mass Media will never show you ….

Note

this first video i found on twitter (thanks to aboriginalnewswire.tumblr.com

Anti-Russians display controversial KKK/US Confederate flag in Kiev

and than i found more

scgnews.com

Videos from Ukraine that the US/EU Mass Media will never show you ….

Post starts here

Video of Right Wing Extremists In Ukraine Committing Violence

The Sugar coated story that the U.S. media has been feeding the public is completely out of sync with the events unfolding on the ground in Ukraine. Here are six videos that you’ll never see aired on the mainstream news.

1.

Ukrainian “protesters” setting police officers on fire

Video here

2.

“Freedom fighters” brutally beat man with batons while he’s laying on the ground

Video here

3.

Literal Neo-Nazis openly marching through Kiev displaying their emblems

Video here

4.

Alexander Muzychko vows to fight “against Jews communists, and Russian scum” for as long as he lives.

Video here

5.

Muzychko brandishing an Ak-47 in parliament and letting them know who is in charge

Video here

Part translation from Video 5:

“The Right Sector was armed and will be armed till the time when it will be necessary, You did not give us this weapon and you will not take it away. Who wants to take away my machine gun, my pistol, my knives?”

6.

Right sector members saluting Nazi style and shout nationalist slogans like “Glory to the nation! Death to enemies!” “Ukraine for Ukrainians.”

Video here

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Sources

Neo-Nazis at the heart of the conflict in Ukraine: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jan/29/ukraine-fascists-ol…

Extreme right emerging as the dominant voice in Ukraine: http://scgnews.com/the-extreme-right-emerging-as-the-dominant-voice-in-u…

Washington’s connection to the Neo-Nazi’s in Ukraine: http://scgnews.com/washingtons-role-in-the-ukrainian-coup-how-it-may-spi…

Far right asserts that this is a nationalist revolution and that joining the EU is out of the question: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/23/ukrainian-far-right-groups-…

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Breaking: Estonian Foreign Minister Urmas Paet and Catherine Ashton discuss Ukraine over the phone ……

smiley-wb-make-up-your2.jpg

Officers of Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) loyal to the ousted President Viktor Yanukovich have hacked phones of Estonian Minister of Foreign Affairs Urmas Paet and High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Catherine Ashton and leaked their conversation to the web. The officials discuss their impressions of what’s happening in the country after the revolution. The gist of it is that Ukrainian people have no trust in any of the leaders of Maidan.
However the most striking thing of all is the fact which concerns the use of force during the revolution, particularly the snipers who killed both protesters and officers of the riot police. Mr. Paet reveals astonishing information (at 8.20 min.) which confirms the rumours that the snipers were employed by the leaders of Maidan.

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Ripe for rebellion? ………

Where protest is likeliest to break out

 

 

From anti-austerity movements to middle-class revolts, in rich countries and in poor, social unrest has been on the rise around the world. The reasons for the protests vary. Some are direct responses to economic distress (in Greece and Spain, for example). Others are revolts against dictatorship (especially in the Middle East). A number also express the aspirations of new middle classes in fast-growing emerging markets (whether in Turkey or Brazil). But they share some underlying features.

The common backdrop is the 2008-09 financial crisis and its aftermath. Economic distress is almost a necessary condition for serious social or political instability, but it is not a sufficient one. Declines in income and high unemployment are not always followed by unrest. Only when economic trouble is accompanied by other elements of vulnerability is there a high risk of instability. Such factors include wide income-inequality, poor government, low levels of social provision, ethnic tensions and a history of unrest. Of particular importance in sparking unrest in recent times appears to have been an erosion of trust in governments and institutions: a crisis of democracy.

Trust has been in secular decline throughout the rich world since the 1970s. This trend accelerated and spread after the collapse of communism in 1989. And as opinion polls have documented, it has sped up again since the 2008–09 financial crisis.

65 countries will be at a high or very high risk

The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), a sister company of The Economist, measures the risk of social unrest in 150 countries around the world. It places a heavy emphasis on institutional and political weaknesses. And recent developments have indeed revealed a deep sense of popular dissatisfaction with political elites and institutions in many emerging markets.

The protesters in Turkey in 2013, for example, were dissatisfied with some abrupt decisions by Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government. In Bulgaria, what started off as protests against higher electricity bills turned into generalised anti-government demonstrations complaining of corruption—and led to the fall of the government. Protests have continued.

What to expect in 2014? The recession is now over or has eased in much of the world. Yet political reactions to economic distress have historically come with a lag. Austerity is still on the agenda in 2014 in many countries and this will fuel social unrest.

Restlessness on the rise

According to the EIU’s ratings, 65 countries (43% of the 150) will be at a high or very high risk of social unrest in 2014. For 54 countries the risk of instability is medium and for the remaining 31 countries it is low or very low. Compared with five years ago, 19 more countries are now in the high-risk categories.

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA), southern Europe, the Balkans and the former Soviet countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) are well represented in the high-risk categories: 12 out of 18 MENA states, six of the seven Balkan countries, eight out of the 12 CIS states, five out of six southern European ones. More than 40% of the countries in eastern Europe are in the high-risk categories. This region was hit hard by the financial crisis and also has many of the underlying characteristics associated with unrest. Unsurprisingly, many high-risk countries are in sub-Saharan Africa. But there are also some in Latin America and Asia—including the world’s largest and most successful emerging market, China, where the authorities are perennially nervous about the risk of mass protests.

 

Laza Kekic: director, country forecasting services, Economist Intelligence Unit

 

15 Photos From the Tahrir Square Protests You’ll Never See In Legacy Media……..

http://www.zerohedge.com

Submitted by Jim Quinn of The Burning Platform blog,

Our interventionist foreign policy is the gift that keeps on giving. Is there any Middle Eastern country that we haven’t screwed up yet? Oh yeah – Iran. Give Obama and McCain time. That will be the clusterfuck that destroys the world.

15 Photos From the Tahrir Square Protests You’ll Never See In Legacy Media.

Gezi Park is now a utopic ‘Freetown’ (Turkish Protests aftermath) ………….

ISTANBUL- Hürriyet Daily News

 

Istanbul’s city center is now a timeless place after the police withdrawal. Closed with barricades, Gezi Park and Taksim now solely belong to the people and ideologies previously deemed closed to the mainstream

 

Two people walk beside a wrecked police car left on Taksim Square. Istanbul’s city center is now a surreal, timeless place after being completely occupied by people following the police withdrawal. DAILY NEWS photo, Emrah GÜREL

Two people walk beside a wrecked police car left on Taksim Square. Istanbul’s city center is now a surreal, timeless place after being completely occupied by people following the police withdrawal. DAILY NEWS photo, Emrah GÜREL

 

Çetin Cem Yılmaz Çetin Cem Yılmaz cetincem.yilmaz@hdn.com.tr

At the entrance of Copenhagen’s famous Freetown Christiania, visitors are greeted with a hand-painted sign reading “You are now leaving the EU.” Right now, something similar can be said for the Gezi Park – it’s no longer Istanbul as you know it.

Since the police withdrawal from the city center on June 1 as a result of clashes with protesters, the Taksim district has been occupied as could never have been predicted. Closed with barricades, the central district now solely belongs to the people, and to ideologies that were previously deemed completely closed to the mainstream.

Bright lights and loud music coming from İstiklal Avenue are not there. Shops are closed, and graffiti fills their windows. On the Taksim Square, it feels like the post-apocalypse has met the day after revolution. A wrecked NTV van and a crashed police car were left like the Berlin Wall remnants – open for photographing. The iconic Atatürk Cultural Center (AKM) has been covered with flags: Legendary 1970’s revolutionary Deniz Gezmiş looks down on the area, while next to him are posters of left-wing groups and a “shut up” call to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

Just a week ago, even the thought of such a scene was impossible. Now, with the occupation, it has become the reality.

Forty-nine percent

Make no mistake, even though it has a passing resemblance to the “Occupy” movement, this is not a “We are the 99 percent” action. It is more like, “We are the 49 percent.” It is the mobilization of thousands who do not find themselves represented in the Parliament. The protests were more about people, mostly youths, making themselves heard by a government that enjoys too much comfort from its majority and forgets to hear the concerns of the minority.

As a crowd that was complaining of discrimination, the Gezi people are embracing their differences beautifully. On June 1, slogans were silenced when a prayer call was heard. “From now on, respect for every belief will prevail,” one said. That approach was again used yesterday, when they asked people not to drink alcohol out of respect to the sacred night of Lailat al–Mi’raj.

Inside the Gezi Park, the utopian feeling is multiplied. There are open buffets for people feeding themselves, yoga sessions in the morning and now, a library. Every morning, after the police withdrawal, protesters got the area squeaky clean. People have fun in their own way and nobody intervenes: Kurds dance their halays, Laz people do their horon dance, and a group with Mustafa Kemal Atatürk flags chant their slogans – All this happens within a few meters’ distance.

There are lots of differences, but no conflict. There’s no police, but it’s safe. No hierarchy, but a humane order.
For a country where the democratic tradition is about rights being given from the top to bottom, it is about reversing the order.

It is about sharing, kindness, and reasoning. So romantic, for sure; but it is there.

We know that it won’t be forever. Enjoy it while it lasts. k HDN

June/06/2013

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Looks almost like war (Turkey protests) …………….

RussiaToday

Note :

btw, Yesterday in Frankfurt/Germany : Riotpolice interupted brutaly a peaceful legal protest against the NWO injuring more than hundred .

What a wonderful World ……

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Argentina Unrest: Brought to you by Goldman Sachs ………………..

Activist Post

Wall Street-owned media group “Clarín” spearheading anti-government drive in South America’s Argentina.

Tony Cartalucci, Contributor

The US-engineered “Arab Spring” brought us the “April 6 Youth Movement” in Egypt, run by Wall Street-backed Mohammed ElBaradei in coordination with the Muslim Brotherhood, the “February 17 Revolution,” consisting of Al Qaeda terrorists of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group in Libya, and now Argentina has the “8N,” or “November 8” movement working in coordination with foreign-owned Argentinian media group, “Clarín.”

Clarin has been enthusiastically supporting the protesters and laying the rhetorical groundwork justifying their street presence.

The Guardian reported in their article, “Argentina protests: up to half a million rally against Fernández de Kirchner,” that (emphasis added):

Word of the demonstration spread through social networks. Many organisers remain anonymous, but Mariana Torres, administrator of the Facebook page El Anti-K, one of the most active in calling for the rally, said she was delighted: “It was a true feast for democracy.”

There was no single cause of discontent. Many in the middle class are angry at the highest inflation in a decade, estimated at a yearly 25% by private economists, currency controls that have created a black market in dollars, and one of the slowest economic growth rates in Latin America.

Banners and chants also took aim at recent corruption cases and Fernández’s efforts to limit the power of big newspaper and TV conglomerates. Clarín, the country’s most powerful media group, has stepped up its criticism of the government before the introduction on 7 December of a law that will weaken its empire.

Mention of the “El Anti-K” Facebook page by the Guardian is interesting for two reasons. First, Mariana Torres and collaborator Marcelo Moran who created the page, have made the unlikely and unqualified claim that they possess no affiliations whatsoever with any political organization. The level of support the protests have received from special interests within Argentina and abroad alone raise serious concerns regarding the veracity of “El Anti-K’s” claims.

Image: Featured on the “El Anti-K” Facebook page, this banner expresses support for the “Fox News” of Argentina, Grupo Clarin. The overwhelming support for a large, special interest media outfit, owned by Goldman Sachs, undermines any legitimacy the 8N movement claims to have.

Second, while the Guardian attempts to portray “El Anti-K” as a separate entity from Clarin, the page itself is riddled with suspicious defenders of Clarin, with one comment even reading (translated roughly from Spanish):

Clarín is a company and as a company is defined is precisely to unite human effort and capital to obtain a benefit. If this is within the law, we who bought their products or services should shut up or find another alternative. The Kristina government is the one who uses our money that we pay (in taxes), then steals it and distributes it for its own interests.

While surely any government is guilty of taking from the people their hard earned cash and misappropriating it in a variety of ways – to somehow claim that Clarin is simply an honest business operating within the law to “unite human effort and capital to obtain benefit,” and that its own unwarranted influence is not a factor, is naive at best. Just how much unwarranted influence does Clarin have to draw from? It is backed by one of the largest corporate-financial institutions on Earth, Goldman Sachs.

Clarin_Shareholders_page43pdf

Image: Taken from page 40 (43 of the .pdf) of Grupo Clarín’s 2011 Annual Report. Goldman Sachs is the largest (and only) named major shareholder of the Clarin Group. The .pdf can be found here.

And as illustrated throughout the duration of the US-engineered “Arab Spring,” a corporate-financial institution like Goldman Sachs is not single entity operating on its own, but part of a larger cartel of corporate-financier interests, who do not secretly plot in smoke-filled board rooms their agenda, but fund well-known policy think-tanks like the Brookings Institution, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), the American Enterprise Institute, and the International Crisis Group (ICG). These think-tanks in turn produce policy that is executed by Western politicians, and talking points which are sold to the public through the vast Western corporate media as well as local outfits like the Clarin Group in Argentina.

US government-funded fronts like the National Endowment for Democracy, Freedom House, and George Soros’ Open Society build up opposition groups inside targeted nations, at times directly funding groups when indigenous special interests are either incapable or disinterested in collaborating with foreign special interests.

In Argentina it is clear that indigenous special interests are linked with Western designs – just as they are in Venezuela, and a nearly identical campaign to undermine both nations is underway.

There is a Real Opposition in Argentina.

And while the current government of Argentina is an obstacle for foreign interests, it is by no means perfect. According to readers from Argentina, there are legitimate opposition groups without ties to foreign interests, or the protesters who recently took to the streets, and in fact, are vehemently opposed to foreign meddling in their country.

They have enumerated grievances against the government of President Cristina Kirchner, but they are poorly covered by local and international media.

It would benefit these groups immensely if they exposed the current protests for what they are, and instead of holding their own protests, began pursuing a program of pragmatic solutions to address their grievances.

The governments of both Venezuela and Argentina do employ populism. If they did not, a Western proxy-candidate would move in and use populism to build a pro-West “people’s movement” as an unassailable voting bloc, just as US-backed Thaksin Shinawatra has been doing in Thailand. Populism is a socioeconomic tool, and only as good or as bad as the people wielding it. And like any tool, overuse has its consequences.

The tension in Argentina is produced by the benefits of populism reaching their limitations in the face of external pressure, sanctions, and attempts at destabilization both political and economic. Just as has been pointed out in Venezuela after recent elections, more permanent solutions must be explored, and genuine opposition groups have an opportunity to lead the way.

If you are in Argentina or are familiar with genuine opposition groups in Argentina, please contact the Land Destroyer Report at cartalucci@gmail.com to describe enumerated grievances and solutions they have put forth, as well as any websites in English or Spanish describing their cause.

Tony Cartalucci’s articles have appeared on many alternative media websites, including his own at Land Destroyer Report.   Read other contributed articles by Tony Cartalucci here.

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